Benjamin Lay was an Anglo-American Quaker “humanitarian” and “abolitionist” which lived {26th January, 1682 to 8th February, 1759}, born into a Quaker and farming family in EnglandCopford, Essex

He is well identified for his initial and persuasive “anti-slavery” accomplishments which would terminate in a dramatic protests.

Benjamin Lay was also a farmer, author, and an early vegetarian, which made him well-renowned by his early concern for the principled treatment of animals.

Lay  was born with restricted growth. Escaping from a miserable apprenticeship to a glover he then ran away to  a  sea where he remained as a seafarer for Approximately 12 years.

When his ship was been docked down at “Bridgetown, Barbados”.  Lay married Sarah Smith, she supported him unconditionally as they confronted the “Weighty Quakers” who possessed slaves

Benjamin Lay settled later in Philadelphia, and he was made un-popular among his fellow Quakers, by his strident anti-slavery stance, which would often culminate in acts of public protest.

Benjamin Lay settled later in Philadelphia, and he was made un-popular among his fellow Quakers, by his strident anti-slavery stance, which would often culminate in acts of public protest.

As he continued to consider himself a “Quaker” all over his life notwithstanding being disclaimed by the Society.

Consequently, he  continued to make dramatic gestures.  Lay stood outside a meeting-house in the snow without a coat and on bare feet to put  Friends on reminder of the hardship experienced by slaves.

Also on another occasion he kidnapped a child and only returned him to his father when the established order came to his dwelling place.