The instrument can sound like a violin, an oboe, or a siren and can produce vocal sounds. Sala quickly became fascinated by the possibilities of this invention.

nternet users hitting up Google to help with their searches on Monday will discover that the search engine's colorful logo has been adapted to shine a spotlight on musical inventor and composer Oskar Sala.

While once well-known for his pioneering work fusing the fields of electronics and musical instruments—he is widely regarded as having helped create a precursor to the synthesizer, which he used to great effect in films such as the Alfred Hitchcock classic The Birds—his contribution may have been in danger of becoming forgotten among all but music historians and film buffs.

Innovative electronic music composer and physicist Oskar Sala would have celebrated his 112th birthday on Monday.

The German is hailed for producing sound effects on a musical instrument called a mixture trautonium that transformed the world of radio, film and television.

The German is hailed for producing sound effects on a musical instrument called a mixture trautonium that transformed the world of radio, film and television.

Sala was born in Greiz, Germany, in 1910. Since birth, he was surrounded by music. His mother was a singer and his father was an ophthalmologist with musical talent.

Sala studied piano and organ at an early age. As a teenager, he began performing classical piano concerts and creating compositions and songs.

At the age of 19, Sala moved to Berlin to study piano and composition with the violinist Paul Hindemith.

At the age of 19, Sala moved to Berlin to study piano and composition with the violinist Paul Hindemith.