Roy Asberry Cooper III (born June 13, 1957) is an American attorney and politician serving as the 75th governor of North Carolina since 2017. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 49th attorney general of North Carolina from 2001 to 2017.

Cooper defeated Republican incumbent Pat McCrory for the governorship in a close race in the 2016 election.[2] On December 5, McCrory conceded the election, making Cooper the first challenger to defeat a sitting governor in the state's history.[3] Cooper took office on January 1, 2017. 

On December 5, McCrory conceded the election, making Cooper the first challenger to defeat a sitting governor in the state's history.

The Republican-dominated legislature passed bills in a special session before he took office to reduce the power of the governor's office. The legislature has overridden several of his vetoes of legislation. Cooper was reelected in 2020, defeating Republican nominee and Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest.

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper signed 11 bills on his desk into law Thursday, including legislation that addresses sexual assault, domestic violence and alcohol sales.

The signed bills were among more than three dozen that the General Assembly sent Cooper in the last two days of its work session, which ended Friday.

One signed measure makes clear that hospitals or medical offices can’t attempt to bill victims of sexual assault or their insurance companies for forensic medical examinations, leaving it to a special state fund that’s already been in place to cover the payment.

The bill, which also expands the number of criminal offenses for which a conviction requires a defendant to provide a DNA sample, came amid reports that dozens of medical facilities may have been sending such bills to insurance companies.

The bill, which also expands the number of criminal offenses for which a conviction requires a defendant to provide a DNA sample, came amid reports that dozens of medical facilities may have been sending such bills to insurance companies.

With another signed bill, patrons of North Carolina’s standalone bars no longer have to become paid members of the establishments first to get a drink.